Philippines Pt. 4 – Corregidor Island & Las Casas Filipinas de Acuzar

This day was long – about 13+ hours of sight-seeing – but it was one of my favorites.  We boarded a ferry early in the morning, and made our way to Corregidor Island, a small tadpole-shaped island at the mouth of Manila Bay.  Our ride was rough, and although there was a doctor on board with lots of sea-sickness medications, many passengers lost their breakfast on the 90 minute ride.  But not me!  🙂  I took some Dramamine, was happy to be there, and enjoyed every moment of the ride, chatting and making new friends.

Our view as we left the city.

Our view as we left the city.

Corregidor was used as a defence post for the entrance of the bay, fortified with several batteries, and coastal artillery and ammunitions magazines, to ward off attacks by enemy warships in the event of war.  During World War II, Corregidor played an important role during the invasion and liberation of the Philippines from Japanese forces. Although heavily bombarded in the latter part of the war, it was briefly used as the temporary location for the Government of the Philippines.  General Douglas MacArthur also used Corregidor as Allied headquarters until March 11, 1942.  Today it is an unoccupied island of ruins, memorials, and a garden of peace.

From boat to trolly busses.

From boat to trolley busses.

Can you spot the goat?

Can you spot the goat?

It is densely lush, green and beautiful.  And as we wound our way through the twisting, narrow roadways, our tour guide/bus driver reassured us several times that Filipinos are a forgiving and happy people, and they love the Americans and Japanese alike.

C55

Hey hey, it's a monkey....

Hey hey, it’s a monkey….

C77

C88

Malinta, meaning "full of leeches;" this 390 foot tunnel was used as a bunker and storage, a 1,000-bed hospital, General MacArthur's headquarters, and finally the location of mass suicide of Japanese soldiers trapped within.

Malinta, meaning “full of leeches;” this 390 foot tunnel was used as a bunker and storage, a 1,000-bed hospital, General MacArthur’s headquarters, and finally the location of mass suicide of Japanese soldiers trapped within.

After our short, but sweet tour of the island, we boarded our boat again for a 45 minute ride to Bataan peninsula.  There we climbed aboard touristy jeepneys (a cleaned-up version of the local transportation), and were driven through beautiful mountains, fields, and jungles to Las Casas Filipinas de Acuzar.

C9

A rare sighting of the ferocious Philippine Tiger.

A rare sighting of the ferocious Philippine Tiger.

The entrance to the town, who's theme is, "Pride in the past, hope for the future."

The entrance to the town, whose theme is, “Pride in the past, hope for the future.”

This little resort town is “a living museum,” with 27 architectural structures, dating back to the 18th to early 20th centuries, that were carefully and painstakingly reconstructed from different parts of the country and rebuilt exactly as they originally were.  We were greeted with live music and singing, and although the weather was rainy, we meandered through the cobblestone streets of the picturesque town.

C1

C2

The stunning view from the bathroom sink.

The stunning view from the bathroom sink.

For lunch we enjoyed a large buffet of traditional dishes, and were entertained by local dancers.  After a little more wandering the area, we got back on the bumpy jeepneys, and made our way to the boat.  To everyone’s relief, our ride back to Manila was smooth and quick, and while it was too cloudy to see the setting sun, the city lights welcomed us back into the harbor.

C4

C5

C6

C7

C8

Back to Manila.

Back to Manila.

Rebecca Knabe

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “Philippines Pt. 4 – Corregidor Island & Las Casas Filipinas de Acuzar

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s